How I Bake and Package Royal Icing Cookies for Party Favors Pt. 3

How I Bake and Package Royal Icing Cookies for Party Favors Pt. 3

Packaging Your Cookies

This tutorial uses a Cricut for simplicity, but you can easily trim these by hand with a pair of scissors or a swing line paper trimmer*. It also uses a heat sealer to keep your cookies fresh.

*Find my cookie tags in the VIP Library.

Halloween Cookie Tags by Victoria Smyrniotis


Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis
Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis
Cookie Tag Packaging by Victoria Smyrniotis

Directions

First things first, you need to know the size of your cookies so that you’ll know what size cookie bags to order. Once you know that, you can decide the size of your tags.

For example, the cookies I make are roughly 2-3 inches wide, so the bags I use are 5x7”. I measured how big I wanted my tags to be and came up with 5x3” as a good template to use.


Tip: Measure twice, cut once. If you have your bags and cookies handy, use a ruler to really visualize your tag to cookie ratio!


cookie tags by victoria smyrniotis-5.jpg

Next, you’ll want to design your tags. I use Adobe InDesign, personally, but you can use whatever works for you. You’ll want to design your tag as one image, so the back side of the tag will look upside down at the top of the image, and the front of the tag will be right side up on the bottom of your image.


Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis
Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis
Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis

I love putting my name or website information on the back. This is also great for parties that have hashtags for guests to contribute to. Or, what’s really nice is just a simple, ‘Thanks for celebrating with us!’ to share a grateful sentiment to your guests.

The front of the tag is the perfect spot to create a cohesive design with the rest of your party. Did you have invitations already made? Try to use a font that was used on that. Did the invitation have graphics you could repurpose for this tag? Is there a color scheme? Is there a name for your event? Definitely include these key design items on your cookie tag to make it all look intentionally designed.


Remember: It doesn’t have to be complicated to be a good design!

Have fun with it!


Halloween Cookie Tags by Victoria Smyrniotis

Once you have your image all ready, it’s time to import it into Cricut. Import it onto your canvas in the Design program, and make sure to rescale it to the appropriate size you need for your tags. Then, add a score line in the horizontal center of your tag - this will make it easy to fold the tags over your bags.

In my experience, I can only fit 2 tags per page. This means for a batch of 30 cookies, I need to make my printer and Cricut do 15 batches of tags for me.

Click make, enter the number of batches you need to make for your cookies, send the images to the printer, then pop them through your Cricut - and now you’ve got yourself a bunch of professional looking cookie tags!

What I love about using a Cricut is that every tag it cuts is precisely cut and folded. So my homemade stack of tags feels like a stack of cards I’d get from a professional lab, just because of that precision.


cookie tags by victoria smyrniotis.jpg
cookie tags by victoria smyrniotis-6.jpg

Heat Sealing

The next steps are pretty simple. Just pop your cookie in your bag, heat seal it with your sealer, trim the excess plastic bag off, then finally staple the tags to your bag. Your cookies should stay at optimal freshness for up to two weeks using this method.


Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis
Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis
Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis
Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis
Halloween Cookie Tag by Victoria Smyrniotis

If you want to have Halloween tags like the ones pictured here, visit the Library! Let me know if you use them - tag me @victoria_smyrniotis !


Photographer and fine artist sharing art, life, and everything in between.